Heller Still Trying to Pass His Radical GOP Health Care Plan

Sen. Dean Heller: “We’re still having meetings to this day trying to figure out the best way to get that concept passed… If we have 51 votes, it’ll come back in a heartbeat”

In a new interview with the Las Vegas Review-Journal, Sen. Heller doubled down again on his radical plan to dismantle the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and made clear he’s still actively pushing to try to move the legislation forward. Heller said he is “still having meetings to this day” to strategize about how to get the concept passed, and he promised Graham-Cassidy-Heller will “come back in a heartbeat” as soon as Senate Republicans have 51 votes to support the plan.

Las Vegas Review-Journal:

Heller is still pushing the Graham-Cassidy proposal to repeal and replace the ACA, one of Trump’s campaign promises.

“We’re still having meetings to this day trying to figure out the best way to get that concept passed,” he said. “If we have 51 votes, it’ll come back in a heartbeat.”

Graham-Cassidy-Heller would be a disaster for Nevada’s hardworking families: it would undermine coverage protections for pre-existing conditions, an estimated 243,000 fewer Nevadans would have health insurance over the next decade, and the state could lose $2.7 billion in federal health care funding through 2027. Nevada’s Republican governor Brian Sandoval strongly opposed the bill.

Rosen for Nevada spokesperson Molly Forgey released the following statement:

“Sen. Heller is not mincing words about the fact that he’s still - to this day - prioritizing his radical Republican health care plan over real bipartisan solutions to improve our health care system for Nevadans. While Jacky Rosen is focused on working together to bring down health care costs and improve the Affordable Care Act, Sen. Heller is still working day in and day out to push repeal. If Dean Heller ever finds 51 votes in the Senate for his harmful legislation, it will deeply cut Medicaid funding for Nevada, slash coverage protections for pre-existing conditions, and cause health care costs for thousands of Nevadans to skyrocket.”